«Comment osez-vous? Vous avez volé mes rêves et mon enfance!»

«Comment osez-vous? Vous avez volé mes rêves et mon enfance!»

Dans un discours furieux à l’ONU, la jeune Suédoise Greta Thunberg a réprimandé les dirigeants de la planète pour leur inaction contre le changement climatique, au début d’un sommet consacré à ce sujet à New York.

«Je ne devrais pas être là, je devrais être à l’école, de l’autre côté de l’océan», a lancé Greta Thunberg, la voix tremblante, lisant un texte préparé.

«Comment osez-vous? Vous avez volé mes rêves et mon enfance avec vos paroles creuses», a-t-elle poursuivi, ajoutant ensuite: «Mais les jeunes commencent à comprendre votre trahison».

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September 23, 2019 at 11:01AM

Apple’s next macOS is here

Apple’s next macOS is here

The new goodies make macOS better than ever

With macOS Catalina, Apple says goodbye to iTunes and hello to the Music app. An official Apple Podcasts app is also available on the free update.

What’s new with macOS 10.15 Catalina?

There are dozens of new features on macOS 10.15. Some are bigger than others, of course.

Three new apps to replace iTunes

Apple has split iTunes into three fresh apps and retired the iTunes name, at least as an app. The apps are: Music, Apple Podcasts, and Apple TV.

Music is a lot like iTunes and even more like the Music app on iOS 13. It offers syncing capabilities for those who still like to sync iPhone and iPad with Mac. For those who love buying music, there’s a store built into the app. That store is called … the iTunes Store!

Apple Podcasts offers an interesting search feature that uses machine learning to help you find a podcast you heard about but forget its name by title, topic, guest, host, and more. Apple says there are now over 700,000 podcasts available.

Finally, the new Apple TV app supports 4K and Dolby Atmos-supported films for the first time on Mac. It looks similar to the iOS version of the Apple TV app.

All three apps — Music, Apple Podcasts, and Apple TV — sync your content through iCloud across your devices. Or sync it from each of the apps if you prefer using a cable.

Updated Apps

Existing Mac apps like Reminders got minor updates in macOS Catalina.

In Notes, there’s a new gallery view that displays your notes as visual thumbnails, which makes it easier to find specific content. There’s also the ability to share notes or entire folders as view-only. With new shared folders, you can collaborate on a folder level with ease. Look for more powerful search functionality as well.

Reminders is completely new in macOS Catalina and includes a new design and more powerful features. These include enhanced Siri intelligence, the ability to add attachments, new edit buttons, and more.

In the Photos app, you’ll now find a new Photos tab, larger photo previews, day, month, and year organization, and auto-playing of Live Photos and videos.

Sidecar with iPad

With Sidecar, you can use your iPad as a second display for Mac! This feature works wirelessly and wired. Sidecar also lets you use the same Multi-Touch gestures with your Mac that you do with your iPad. Draw and sketch are also supported.

The surprise news here is just how many third-party apps already supporting Sidecar on day one. These include Adobe Illustrator, Affinity Designer and Photo, CorelDRAW, Sketch, and many more.

Screen Time for Mac

In macOS Catalina, Screen Time makes the leap from iOS. Among the features is the ability to combine limits based on app categories, specific apps, or websites. Screen Time for macOS also lets you control who your child can communicate with and who can communicate with them. There’s also One More Minute, a simple way to give your children 60 more seconds before things go dark.

Accessibility

On macOS Catalina, there’s Voice Control, a new way to fully control your Mac, iPadOS, and iOS devices with your voice. It’s just one of many new accessibility features in macOS Catalina.

Safari improvements

The native web browser for Mac picks up a few new features in macOS Catalina, beginning with the start page. Joining links to your favorites and frequently visited websites, this page now includes Siri suggestions. These links are based on your overall browsing history, recently visited sites, bookmarks, and more. Safari on macOS Catalina also offers weak password warnings, which pops up when you attempt to create a new password. When doing so, it will help you replace the password with a stronger one. Safari also includes Picture in Picture (PiP) from the tab audio button for the first time.

Find My app

Find My iPhone and Find My Friends have been merged on both Mac, iPhone, and iPad as Find My. The combined app lets you locate the people and devices that are important to you.

Activation Lock

Available on all Macs with a T2 Security Chip, Activation Lock allows you to erase and deactivate your Mac in the event that it’s stolen. It’s similar to a feature already available on iPhone and iPad.

Screen Time for Mac

One year after it arrived on iOS, ScreenTime is coming to macOS too. The controls allow you to keep track of your usage on Mac and also restrict the content that’s available. You can also use ScreenTime to turn off features at certain times of the day.

Approve with Apple Watch

You can soon double-click the side button of your Apple Watch to authenticate on your Mac. In doing so, you can unlock a locked note, approve app installations, and view your passwords in Safari preferences without having to enter one.

Sign In with Apple

With Sign In with Apple, in iOS 13, iPadOS 13, and macOS Catalina, you can use an encrypted "burner" email address (if you will) to sign up for and into services that support third-party sign-on services online. It’s a single sign-on service, similar to the way Google and Facebook allow you to use your account credentials to sign up for and sign in to apps and services.

Mail’s new tools

The native email app on macOS can now block all mail from specified senders. From there, the emails are automatically sent to your trash folder. The Mail app also (finally) lets you unsubscribe to emails — just like you can do in iPhone.

Dedicated system volume

Your system files on macOS are now kept in a dedicated, read-only volume that’s separated from your other data. This makes it harder for you to overwrite critical files accidentally.

When can I download the official version of macOS Catalina?

macOS Catalina is a free update available in the Mac App Store.

My Mac is old, can I upgrade to macOS Catalina?

The latest Mac operating system will run on the following devices:

  • MacBook (2015 or newer)
  • MacBook Air (2012 or newer)
  • MacBook Pro (2012 or newer)
  • Mac mini (2012 or newer)
  • iMac (2012 or newer)
  • iMac Pro (2017 or newer)
  • Mac Pro (2013 or newer)

Lots to see

Which macOS Catalina features are you most excited about seeing?

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September 4, 2019 at 08:01AM

How to Use Vibrant Colors in Photography with Great Success

How to Use Vibrant Colors in Photography with Great Success

The post How to Use Vibrant Colors in Photography with Great Success appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Nisha Ramroop.

How to Use Vibrant Colors in Photography with Great Success

Your camera is capable of capturing intense, true color that is almost everywhere you look. So how hard could it be? Answer: It is actually quite easy to capture color. However, you need to practice a little more awareness when it comes to creating images with that extra “oomph.” Here are a few tips to help you capture vibrant colors in photography.

1. Keep it simple/details

As with other types of photography, simplicity is an art on its own. While details are can be essential too, sometimes scaling back on the amount of details is required. Thus, when working with vibrant colors in photography, your story may have more impact when you include only the key elements as opposed to having too much going on.

How to Use Vibrant Colors in Photography with Great Success

You can achieve simplicity in different ways. The first is by minimizing the number of colors in the frame. Yes, there are instances when many colors work well together in an image, but at other times it gets confusing. You need to direct your viewer’s eyes. Another way to keep it simple is to avoid too many details in your composition. It has the same effect as too many colors. When working with vibrant colors, simple works better.

2. Experiment with color combinations

Starting small is usually better with bolder colors. You can focus on one main color and build from there. When you start adding other colors in, determine if they work well together. Fortunately, you do not have to reinvent the color wheel and have tried-and-true color harmonies to use to your advantage.

How to Use Vibrant Colors in Photography with Great Success

Color harmony is a combination that is visually appealing to the eyes. Some of the options include complementary colors (those directly opposite each other on the wheel) and analogous color (those next to each other).

Both of these harmonies exist in the natural world. A sunset of oranges and blues is an example of complementary colors. Whereas a green tree against the midday blue sky is more along the lines of analogous color. When you are working with color combinations, spend the time to make the final image pleasing to the eyes.

How to Use Vibrant Colors in Photography with Great Success

3. Make colors stand out/playoff

Your scene may be full of color, vibrant and busy. If this is what you want to portray, then all is well. On the other hand, what if there is a subject in that chaos that you want to isolate? You can use color to make that happen. To do so, one of your options is to desaturate/tone down the colors that are not contributing to your subject’s story.

How to Use Vibrant Colors in Photography with Great Success

Another is putting a bright color against a dull one to help it to stand out more. Also, adjusting the hue and lightness of the colors next to your main color can help it pop.

Here are a few easy ways for you to help your colors play off each other:

White Balance

Pay attention to your use of white balance when working with bold and strong colors. Your camera has several white balance options to deal with different lighting situations (Shade, Cloudy, Fluorescent, etc.). Each of these affects the overall color of your image. They either move your color to the warmer side (by adding yellow) or to the cooler side (by adding blue). Thus, white balance can enhance your colors or change the hue altogether.

vibrant-colors-in-photography

Note: If you do not want your colors to end up looking too blue or yellow, you have the option of manually adjusting your white balance color temperature.

Saturation

By default, Saturation is used to enhance the color intensity of every color in an image. However, you can use editing software and use Saturation selectively. When trying to make colors play off each other, you can increase the intensity of one color while desaturating other colors in the scene.

vibrant-colors-in-photography

Vibrance vs Saturation (the same level applied)

Vibrancy

When you change the Vibrance in an image, it is a little more specific than Saturation. Vibrance only adjusts the intensity of the duller colors in your image. When playing off colors, this tool can be very effective.

How to Use Vibrant Colors in Photography with Great Success

Conclusion

When working with vibrant colors, be aware of your palette. Keep your compositions simple by minimizing the number of colors and details in your image. Work with the color wheel and learn about the various harmonies that exist. When you pay attention to all the colors in your image, you get a better sense of how they work together. You also understand the way each color affects and plays off the other. Most of all, have fun experimenting while you learn about color!

Do you have other tips for using vibrant colors in photography? Share with us in the comments section!

 

vibrant-colors-in-photography

The post How to Use Vibrant Colors in Photography with Great Success appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Nisha Ramroop.

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August 19, 2019 at 08:45AM

Comment envoyer sa position GPS rapidement aux secours ? (Affaire Simon Gautier)

Comment envoyer sa position GPS rapidement aux secours ? (Affaire Simon Gautier)

Simon Gautier, ce jeune français installé en Italie, et retrouvé décédé ce week-end suite à une randonnée qui a mal tourné, a remis sur la table une question centrale autour du positionnement des victimes.

Dans le cas du jeune homme, ce dernier était parvenu, malgré son accident, à appeler les secours avec son téléphone portable. Malheureusement, il semble que ce dernier n’ait pas réussi à envoyer un positionnement précis au moment de l’appel. Les autorités ont dû faire appel à la géolocalisation via les antennes relais, ce qui engendre un périmètre de recherche souvent trop étendu pour intervenir à temps, surtout si la zone est peu habitée.

Sur iOS, il existe un moyen simple de connaitre sa position GPS. Il n’y a pas besoin de réseau de données, il suffit d’ouvrir l’app « Boussole » présente par défaut, et de lire les coordonnées inscrites sur la partie basse :

C’est très pratique, car votre téléphone peut utiliser n’importe quel réseau de n’importe quel opérateur pour appeler les secours vocalement (112), et vous n’avez pas besoin de 3G/4G/5G pour transférer l’information. Le seul impératif est de pouvoir capter le GPS, et donc, d’avoir le ciel en visuel. Il faut aussi pouvoir lancer une app, ce qui n’est pas toujours facile suivant la gravité des blessures.

Voilà pourquoi un système créé en Europe et appelé Advanced Mobile Location (AML) permet justement d’utiliser la puce GPS et les SMS pour envoyer automatiquement vos coordonnées aux secours en cas d’appel. Apple était à la traine face à Android et iOS n’est compatible que depuis 2018 (iOS 11.3). Il faut également que les pays prennent en charge le service (ce qui est assez coûteux), mais il s’agit désormais d’une obligatoire européenne. L’Italie comme la France n’ont pas encore d’AML pleinement actif (des phases de test sont a priori en cours), mais le système devrait être enfin déployée d’ici la fin de l’année. « La France fait partie d’une deuxième phase de développement et je pense qu’elle va mettre en place l’AML d’ici à la fin de l’année. D’autres pays, comme l’Estonie, la Finlande ou la Suède l’ont réalisé sans fonds européens. Aujourd’hui, un tiers des pays européens ont l’AML et un autre tiers est en train d’y travailler. » a déclaré Jérôme Pâris, directeur de l’ONG European Emergency Number Association (EENA) à LaCroix.

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August 19, 2019 at 06:38AM

Le complot mondial sur la conquête spatiale et tous ses secrets enfin révélés !

Le complot mondial sur la conquête spatiale et tous ses secrets enfin révélés !

Il n’y a pas que la politique, les actes de terrorisme ou la vie dissolue des blogueurs et youtubeurs qui sont le terreau de tous les complots. Non, non, il y a aussi l’espace et ses innombrables merveilles.

J’ai d’ailleurs déjà été confronté, suite à des articles sur l’espace, à des gens qui me soutenaient que l’Homme n’avait jamais marché sur la Lune ou qu’il n’y avait pas de robots sur Mars, voire qu’au contraire, ça faisait super longtemps que les Américains ont une base secrète sur Mars.

M’enfin, globalement, il y a souvent les mêmes questions qui reviennent, du genre pourquoi les fusées ne montent pas droit, pourquoi n’y a-t-il aucune photo de la terre vue de la lune, pourquoi les astronautes ne jure-t-il pas sur la bible, pourquoi ne sommes nous pas retournés sur la lune en 50 ans ou encore pourquoi n’y a-t-il pas de poussière sur les pieds du module lunaire…et j’en passe.

La bonne nouvelle, c’est que le youtubeur Defakator a passé en revue toutes ces questions et plus encore et cela vous permettra de rétablir la vérité dans les mares de complotistes.

Youpi !

Console PS4 Sony PS4 Slim 500Go Noire + Code Fortnite – 299,99€

Capacité du disque dur : 500 Go
Résolution : 1080p, 1080i, 720p, 480p, 480i

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July 31, 2019 at 04:16AM

Apollo 11 Moon Launch 50th Anniversary

Apollo 11 Moon Launch 50th Anniversary

Fifty years ago today, Apollo 11 began its voyage into American history. The Saturn V rocket carrying astronauts Neil Armstrong, Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin and Michael Collins launched from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida at 9:32 a.m. on July 16, 1969 — and just four days later, man first set foot on the moon. The moon mission was a milestone in human history. But it was also a groundbreaking moment in broadcast television, as CBS News anchor Walter Cronkite brought the frontier of space to living rooms across America. W..(Read…)

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July 17, 2019 at 09:21AM

When is the Best Time to Photograph the Moon?

When is the Best Time to Photograph the Moon?

The post When is the Best Time to Photograph the Moon? appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Peter West Carey.

Moon phases are a key to understanding when you should be out taking photos. These days it’s easy to predict where and when you will see the moon for the type of photos you want to produce.

First let’s start with some tools you might want to look into, then options for different moon phase photos.

Tools

Astronomers have known the secrets of the moon’s phases and timing for eons. Ancient civilizations built monuments and shrines in regard to locations of the sun, moon and stars long before computers were invented. Our modern tools are a little easier to access.

Newspapers and Websites

Not into learning full astronomy? My first suggestion is to Google the phase you’re looking for. It’s that simple. One of the top sites that will appear in the results is Time & Date. You can find all the phases of the moon, based on the location of your Internet connection, right here. If the location isn’t correct, simply search for your city and the site will give you all you need to get started.

Another great option (that also has an app, but it is so much better on a large computer screen) is The Photographer’s Ephemeris (TPE). I wrote about using TPE here on DPS and they have a Web App available for those who don’t use phones and their apps.

The US Navy has a simple site that allows you to print out a year’s worth of times for any location on the planet.

Don’t have an Internet connection while you travel? Newspapers still print the information for the moon and sun phases (as well as setting and rising times).

Apps

Everyone loves a good app, and there are three that I keep loaded on my phone for photography purposes. All of these apps will show you the angle of the moon at any time, its phase, and some even help you calculate the best time to photograph the moon.

Full moon over Washington’s Cascade Mountains

My choices are:

Catching the Full Moon

The best time to photograph the full moon is the day before or after a full moon. Why’s this?

A full moon is marked at the height of its path across the heavens and this is often after midnight. Let’s say the moon reaches the height of its fullness at 12:26 am on July 2nd. This means the full moon actually rises on the day BEFORE that which is marked on the calendar. Throw in use of Daylight Saving Time and the timing can be wonky.

Full moon rising above Washington’s Cascade Mountains and Puget Sound

Going out the day before the moon is actually marked as full means you’re catching the moon rising just about at the same time as the sun is setting. So the sun is lighting the moon and often the foreground of your scene. This gives a nice, even lighting to your scene.

The same can be said for shooting the full moon setting the day it is marked on the calendar.

Late at night, you can still capture great images of the moon. However, you have to understand that the contrast difference between the moon (a giant reflector in space) and the black sky will be immense. This means you will lose detail in the moon if you attempt to hold the shutter open long enough to exposure the foreground. Some creative light painting can come in handy in this case.

Full moon and chorten with the Himalayas in the background. Mong La, Nepal

Half/Quarter Moons – Daytime wonders

Some people call them half-moons because half of the moon is illuminated. Some call them quarter because they are at the quarter phase of a full cycle. Either way, they look the same.

Half-moons will rise or set in the middle of the day. It matters on whether the moon is waxing or waning, meaning if it is getting closer to full or further away in its cycle. This is a good time to use an app or Astro calendar to plan ahead.

You’ll be best served by catching a half moon when it is rising or setting, just like with a full moon. Having it closer to the foreground subjects will help it appear larger. Let me give you an example.

Here’s the half moon rising in Canmore, Alberta, Canada just behind the Rocky Mountains.

Half moon and the Canadian Rockies

Nice and large when using a long lens and the moon is close to the ground. It is fairly high in the sky here as I am looking way up at the mountain.

Now, here are two examples with a nearly half moon over Half Dome in Yosemite National Park, and another of it over Seattle, Washington.

See the issue? It’s still a half moon, but later in its cycle, when it is far from foreground objects, it is relatively small and loses some grandeur.

Slivers or Crescents

Slivers, or crescents, are visible just before and after a new moon. Look for them a couple of days before and after the new moon and, just like full and half, try to find a time when they are low on the horizon.

Crescent moon setting over the Himalayas

You will also notice the sliver will seemingly rotate as it crosses the heavens and this may affect your composition choices. As with the half moon, you will have even more trouble giving the moon prominence in a mid-day shoot when it is high in the sky.

Lunar Eclipses

Lunar eclipses are all the fashion these days with this or that news source touting, “This will be the last blah, blah, blah for decades!”  But don’t let them fool you; lunar eclipses happen often enough – about once a year. However, their location can be the biggest issue. Let’s go back to Time & Date’s site for more info on upcoming lunar eclipses for the next 10 years. You’ll need to click on the “Lunar” tab once on the page.

Not all of those eclipses will happen in your neck of the woods, so you’ll have to click through and see where they will happen. As with solar eclipses, when the sun is blotted out by the moon, people will often travel far and wide for lunar eclipse shots.

A full lunar eclipse, at its height, means the moon will be completely in the shadow of the Earth. Because of the distance between the Earth and moon, some light still slips past the Earth, which causes it to have all colors except red stripped away. This is why lunar eclipses are sometimes called blood moons.

Again, having a foreground subject helps because the eclipse often happens high in the sky. The whole sequence of the moon moving into and then fully out of the Earth’s shadow can take a little over an hour, and you should plan accordingly. The colorful and best ‘action’ of the eclipse will span maybe 5-10 minutes.

More tips on capturing lunar (and solar) eclipses are found in this DPS article.

New Moon or No Moon – Photograph the Stars

When the moon’s not out, it’s a great time to photograph the stars. And my, oh, my, do we have a batch of great articles to help you with that!

Conclusion

Moon photography is a fun and challenging subject because the moon is constantly changing phases and its location in the sky. Thankfully, we have plenty of tools at our disposal to track and plan for great moon photos. While full moons are alluring, try your hand at the other phases, too.

Feel free to share your photos of the moon with the dPS community in the comments below.

best time to photograph the moon

 

The post When is the Best Time to Photograph the Moon? appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Peter West Carey.

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June 10, 2019 at 10:12AM

The Real History of Father’s Day

The Real History of Father’s Day

Father’s Day is this Sunday—in case you need a reminder—and while golf, beer, and barbecue may come to mind, it’s a celebration with complex, religious origins and one even arguably fueled by the women’s liberation movement that began in the 60s.

The very first American Father’s Day dates back more than a century; in 1909 and during a sermon celebrating Mother’s Day (which was unofficially recognized as a national celebration by this time), a woman named Sonora Smart Dodd hoped to celebrate her father—a civil war veteran and a single parent raising her and her five brothers—with a sermon dedicated to dads everywhere.

There were other attempts at organizing Father’s Day celebrations before this time, however. In 1908, a West Virginia Church dedicated its sermons to fathers, though it wasn’t intended to become an annual event.

Dodd soon petitioned for a day of dad-related sermons before the Spokane Ministerial Alliance of Washington, also lobbying other churches, the local YMCA, and shopkeepers, and was successful; the first ever Father’s Day Sermon took place on June 19, 1910, a Sunday—Dodd had hoped to celebrate the day on June 5, her father’s birthday, but timing and planning difficulties delayed the event a few days. Other pastors at nearby churches followed suit, and it’s said that Dodd soon received hundreds of letters applauding her efforts.

The celebration of fathers eventually gained momentum with the endorsements of President Woodrow Wilson in 1916 and President Calvin Coolidge in 1924— but it wasn’t without criticism, with some detractors pointing out the mass commercialism of the growing celebration of the holiday. As Time notes, the holiday piqued the interest of many clothing manufacturers hoping to profit off a new-found holiday.

By 1966 and despite criticism, President Lyndon B. Johnson issued the first presidential proclamation calling upon the recognition of the third Sunday in June as Father’s Day, roughly 56 years after Dodd’s first celebration. “I invite State and local governments to cooperate in the observance of that day and I urge all our people to give public and private expression to the love and gratitude which they bear for their fathers,” he said during the proclamation.

Father’s Day may also have gained new momentum in the 60s and 70s and during the Vietnam War. As the feminist movement gained traction, women wanted equality in the workplace, and a more equitable domestic division of duties, as well. Now, men were sharing household chores more evenly. As Time notes, it “got stranger that women were celebrated in a way that fathers weren’t yet.”

Photo: Jeff T. Green (AP)

Eventually, under President Richard Nixon, Father’s Day was made official in 1972, with the former president calling upon all government buildings to raise the American flag in observance of the day. Dodd, who is officially recognized as the founder of Father’s Day, died six years later. Today, it’s estimated that Father’s Day is celebrated in 110 countries, with many celebrations also taking place in June.

So while you celebrate your dad this Sunday, don’t forget: the holiday has a long and thoughtful history and we have one woman to thank for giving fathers a special day of recognition. Now go give your dad a hug.


For more from Lifehacker, be sure to follow us on Instagram @lifehackerdotcom.

Curiosité

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June 11, 2019 at 01:01PM

The Real History of Father’s Day

The Real History of Father’s Day

http://bit.ly/31rXJCw

Father’s Day is this Sunday—in case you need a reminder—and while golf, beer, and barbecue may come to mind, it’s a celebration with complex, religious origins and one even arguably fueled by the women’s liberation movement that began in the 60s.

The very first American Father’s Day dates back more than a century; in 1909 and during a sermon celebrating Mother’s Day (which was unofficially recognized as a national celebration by this time), a woman named Sonora Smart Dodd hoped to celebrate her father—a civil war veteran and a single parent raising her and her five brothers—with a sermon dedicated to dads everywhere.

There were other attempts at organizing Father’s Day celebrations before this time, however. In 1908, a West Virginia Church dedicated its sermons to fathers, though it wasn’t intended to become an annual event.

Dodd soon petitioned for a day of dad-related sermons before the Spokane Ministerial Alliance of Washington, also lobbying other churches, the local YMCA, and shopkeepers, and was successful; the first ever Father’s Day Sermon took place on June 19, 1910, a Sunday—Dodd had hoped to celebrate the day on June 5, her father’s birthday, but timing and planning difficulties delayed the event a few days. Other pastors at nearby churches followed suit, and it’s said that Dodd soon received hundreds of letters applauding her efforts.

The celebration of fathers eventually gained momentum with the endorsements of President Woodrow Wilson in 1916 and President Calvin Coolidge in 1924— but it wasn’t without criticism, with some detractors pointing out the mass commercialism of the growing celebration of the holiday. As Time notes, the holiday piqued the interest of many clothing manufacturers hoping to profit off a new-found holiday.

By 1966 and despite criticism, President Lyndon B. Johnson issued the first presidential proclamation calling upon the recognition of the third Sunday in June as Father’s Day, roughly 56 years after Dodd’s first celebration. “I invite State and local governments to cooperate in the observance of that day and I urge all our people to give public and private expression to the love and gratitude which they bear for their fathers,” he said during the proclamation.

Father’s Day may also have gained new momentum in the 60s and 70s and during the Vietnam War. As the feminist movement gained traction, women wanted equality in the workplace, and a more equitable domestic division of duties, as well. Now, men were sharing household chores more evenly. As Time notes, it “got stranger that women were celebrated in a way that fathers weren’t yet.”

Photo: Jeff T. Green (AP)

Eventually, under President Richard Nixon, Father’s Day was made official in 1972, with the former president calling upon all government buildings to raise the American flag in observance of the day. Dodd, who is officially recognized as the founder of Father’s Day, died six years later. Today, it’s estimated that Father’s Day is celebrated in 110 countries, with many celebrations also taking place in June.

So while you celebrate your dad this Sunday, don’t forget: the holiday has a long and thoughtful history and we have one woman to thank for giving fathers a special day of recognition. Now go give your dad a hug.


For more from Lifehacker, be sure to follow us on Instagram @lifehackerdotcom.

Curiosité

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June 11, 2019 at 01:01PM

Mon Blog

http://bit.ly/2MEYYv6

iOS 13: Major new features explained!

iOS 13: Major new features explained!

iOS 13 brings several major changes to the iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Yes, iPad now runs iPadOS, but for right now that’s just a thin name on top of a very big stack. Here are some of the biggest changes in iOS 13 and iPadOS, how they work, and what they could mean for you and your workflows!

Rather watch than read? Hit play on the video version!

iOS 13: Dark mode

Dark Mode is going to be on every list from every lister. How can it not be? Anytime any platform announces it, it gets the loudest cheers this side of emoji. But, just like with macOS last year with its subtle, sampled tints and accents, Apple is Dark Moding smart.

First, they’ve established Symantec, dynamic colors. So, rather than hard code colors — for example, making a background RGB 0 0 0 black and label text RGB 255 255 255, that would break the instant you switch modes from light to dark — you simply refer to them as, in the example case, systemGroupedBackground and label respectively. And a blue icon isn’t RGB 10 132 255 anymore but systemBlue. That way, when you switch from light to dark or back, it’s not stuck on the same color but picks the appropriate color each time.

If you’re familiar with web design, think of it as something closer to CSS. And, what’s really cool, is that this sets up apps to work not just across a potentially wider range of themes but across a wider range of platforms. For example, Catalyst apps on the Mac will get the same light and dark mode support right out of the box. Or, rather, the checkbox.

There’s also a well thought out hierarchy, from absolute white or black backgrounds to increasingly darker shades for light them and lighter shades for dark theme, so the visual hierarchy is always clear. In other words, you can tell how many cards are stacked on top of each other by the shade of each card.

Same with text. Primary text is pure white on black, the inverse of backgrounds, and as you move towards secondary and tertiary text, the color moves across the spectrum of gray.

Same with controls as well. Dark mode doesn’t just invert light mode. A white button doesn’t become a black one. A white button with light gray states becomes a medium gray button with dark gray states. It can even apply to images, so, for example, a header with a daytime skyline in light mode can switch to a nighttime skyline in dark mode.

It’s all set up so that everything just looks right, in context, maintains legibility, and gives you a visual cue to how important it is, no matter which state you’re in.

Dark mode even gets its own materials look. In other words, the blur effect that helps separate content from controls, and the vibrancy that makes them seem real and alive.

I still really, really wish shadows would come back to iOS but, absent that, Apple’s done a good job defining spaces and relationships in a dark mode world.

And, for people like me, who find dark mode oppressive and straining during the day but blessedly subdued and calming at night, the automatic transition switch is absolutely aces.

iOS 13: Sign in with Apple

One of my favorite announcements this year was Sign in with Apple. It’s not specific to iOS — it’ll work on iPad OS, watchOS, macOS and even on Android or Chrome via JavaScript. But, it’s especially important on iOS not just because of the sheer number of iPhone users but because it fits the iPhone model, which demands speed and convenience, so damn perfectly.

Here’s how it works. Download an app, like a new game, and if it offers sign in with Google and Facebook, it has to offer sign in with Apple as well. Yeah, that’s totally Apple being a bully, but in totally the best-for-users way.

If the game doesn’t care about your data and just wants you in and playing as fast as possible, it can literally do just that. Tap and go. If it does want your data, like your name and email, Sign in with Apple will give it your verified Apple ID name and, if you’re ok with it, your verified Apple ID email address as well.

If you’re not ok with it, Sign in with Apple will create a burner address for you, random, anonymized, that you can reply to if and when needed, but also revoke any time, just for that app. And Apple never sees or retains any of these emails. Which also means companies like Facebook, which try to build shadow profiles on us based on connecting everything around our email addresses, are shut out of luck.

Sign in with Apple will even check Keychain to make sure you don’t already have an account, for example if you downloaded Fortnite and didn’t realize it was from Epic, but already had an Epic account. And if you do have an existing account, it’ll just prompt you to login rather than creating duplicate accounts, and that way you don’t lose any in-game currency or benefits or whatever attached to your existing account. It’s super clever.

It’ll also, on device, check a number of signals including how long you’ve been using the App Store, for example, and then flip a trust bit between true and false and send that on to the developer. If it’s true, it means Apple trusts you’re a real person and the developer can give you the red carpet treatment and doesn’t have to make you jump through hoops to validate yourself before you start using the app. If it’s not true, they can then go ahead with validation, just in case you’re a bot or a farmed account or whatever.

For us it means fewer passwords to remember and, because it uses Apple’s two-factor and Face ID or Touch ID authentication, better security as well as privacy, and almost transparent convenience.

And the developers I spoke to at the event seemed to love it to because it gives them all the advantages of a single sign-on system without them having to make a deal with the data exploitation devils and serve up their users to get it.

iOS 13: Siri & Machine Learning

John Gianandrea leaving his job as head of search and AI at Google in order to work on ethical machine learning at Apple, and subsequently becoming a Senior Vice President with his own AI org is probably going to go down in history as the biggest thing since Johny Srouji began heading up silicon, and we’ve all seen how that’s been working out.

It’s going to start slowly but it’s also going to snowball. This year, there’s a whole bunch of Siri and Siri-adjacent stuff coming in iOS 13, including full-on Voice Control, which I talked about in my iPadOS video — link in the description — and new, conversational, automation-integrated Siri shortcuts, which I’ll talk about in a video later this week.

Siri’s even getting a new voice. And yeah, it’s hella ironic that to sound more human Siri has to become more synthetic, but that’s AI.

When Siri gets a request for local data, like contacts, rather than having to anonymize and tokenize that data to preserve privacy while operating on it in the cloud, it just bounces the request back to your local device so neither you nor Apple ever has to worry about where or how your personal information is being stored or used. Which is phenomenal.

Siri is also getting a couple of new SiriKit intents. Maps, for one, so you can use Siri with Waze or Google Maps. Audio for another, so, as long as the developers implement it, you’ll be able to use Siri with everything from Overcast to Audible, Pandora to Spotify.

It’s a bummer it doesn’t work with video yet, because I’d love the same to work with Netflix or Nebula, but if you add this to the watchOS announcements around SwiftUI native apps and streaming audio, and Spotify has almost nothing left on its victimy little list to complain about. Revenue sharing aside — which, yeah, is a huge aside — in terms of implementation it’s all on them now.

What Apple’s doing here is pretty clever as well. The biggest hurdle to SiriKit for media has always been… the media. Siri has to be able to tell what content is available so it can cleanly separate the request from what’s being requested, especially in multiple languages. Some other assistants lock you into specific grammar patterns, which can be awkward. For Apple Music, Apple just brute-forces the catalog, which is beyond laborious.

Thanks to that, whatever overlaps with Apple’s catalog will just work. In other words, where the content is the same, everyone gets that for free. But no catalog overlaps entirely. So, for content that isn’t in Apple’s catalog, SiriKit is going to pull and front-load the most frequently and recently played content. That cuts down the overhead significantly in most cases.

There’s a bunch of other super-cool, Siri-adjacent stuff coming as well, including Message Announce for AirPods, multi-user for HomePod, and I think some stuff that hasn’t even made it into any of the announcements yet. I’ll get a video up on all of that as soon as possible as well.

iOS 13: Apple Maps

Apple launched their own Maps back with iOS 6 and, because they had no first-party data and no real idea how Maps was supposed to work, the result was a poorly integrated, poorly sanitized, poorly cleansed mish-mash of difference services resulting in… bad results. And also missing features like transit and street view.

Over the years, though, Apple worked to improve and expand them, adding back transit, and for the last little while, driving, flying, and hiking their way across the U.S. and other countries to make what they claim will eventually be the best Maps in the world.

The U.S. should be done by the end of this year, Canada and some other countries by the end of next, and then onward to everywhere they can safely, legally map.

They’re crowd-sourcing more than ever, but maintaining privacy by refusing to track your beginning and end points and throwing away random segments in between. And with iOS 13, they’re re-introducing a view of the street called Look Around. It’s the visual information you want with the video-game-like performance you never knew you wanted. And it’s got data layers so that you can get more information on whatever you see if and when you want to.

There are no AR maps yet, which still seems really strange to me given Apple’s investment in both those things separately.

There are favorites and collections, so you can easily get to frequent destinations or places you’ve book marked for a trip. And MapKit and MapKit JS, along with a cool new Snapshot feature, so all of this is also available in apps and on the web.

And, thanks to Voice Control, you can even use them like something straight out of Blade Runner now. Grid. Zoom. Enhance! (We just need to keep filing all the radars for Enhance.)

There’s also a great new privacy feature where, instead of always or only when using, you can now grant apps permission to use your location only once. That’s it. That’s all. And if they keep using it, by API hook or Bluetooth crook, Apple shows you what they’re tracking so can decide if it’s necessary and useful or just grossly creepy and shut them down or delete them off, whatever you like.

Love it so much.

iOS 13: Camera & Photos

Apple is almost certainly saving all the big camera updates for the iPhone 11 event and announcement but we did get a few new features and capabilities I wanted to touch on here and now.

First, there’s a new high key mono Portrait Lighting effect that gives you a black and white image on a white background instead of black. It’s only coming to 2018 iPhones, because it hits the A12 Neural Engine hard. It’s also not in the beta just yet, but when it gets added you’ll also be able to adjust the intensity, like you can Bokeh with depth control, and Apple has modeled each Portrait Lighting effect specifically for pulling the light back or pushing it up in close.

If you take a series of Live Photos, holding down on the first one now plays all of them seamlessly, one after the other, like a single long video.

Saliency was also the new geeky WWDC word of the week. And no, it has nothing to do with salt. It’s a fancy way to say relevancy and from audio to voice to image to everything, Apple’s machine learning is working to figure out what the most important elements are in any context and heat map them for you.

So, for example, making sure thumbnails contain faces or figures so you can more easily tell what’s important to you at a glance.

Then, there’s something we’ve been waiting a decade for. No, not smart orientation lock that still lets landscape photos and video go landscape. We’re still waiting on that. But video editing.

Video came to iPhone with iPhone 3G and iOS 3 in 2009 and, ten years later, so has editing. Now, not only can you easily rotate a video without round-tripping to iMovie, you can apply almost every kind of editing tool available to photos. It’s great for when you just want to fix the thing you have and not, you know, create something entirely new.

iOS 13 is currently in developer beta. It’ll come too public beta in early July and ship sometime this September.

Apple

via iMore – The #1 iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch blog https://www.imore.com/

June 11, 2019 at 01:45PM