The Real History of Father’s Day

The Real History of Father’s Day

Father’s Day is this Sunday—in case you need a reminder—and while golf, beer, and barbecue may come to mind, it’s a celebration with complex, religious origins and one even arguably fueled by the women’s liberation movement that began in the 60s.

The very first American Father’s Day dates back more than a century; in 1909 and during a sermon celebrating Mother’s Day (which was unofficially recognized as a national celebration by this time), a woman named Sonora Smart Dodd hoped to celebrate her father—a civil war veteran and a single parent raising her and her five brothers—with a sermon dedicated to dads everywhere.

There were other attempts at organizing Father’s Day celebrations before this time, however. In 1908, a West Virginia Church dedicated its sermons to fathers, though it wasn’t intended to become an annual event.

Dodd soon petitioned for a day of dad-related sermons before the Spokane Ministerial Alliance of Washington, also lobbying other churches, the local YMCA, and shopkeepers, and was successful; the first ever Father’s Day Sermon took place on June 19, 1910, a Sunday—Dodd had hoped to celebrate the day on June 5, her father’s birthday, but timing and planning difficulties delayed the event a few days. Other pastors at nearby churches followed suit, and it’s said that Dodd soon received hundreds of letters applauding her efforts.

The celebration of fathers eventually gained momentum with the endorsements of President Woodrow Wilson in 1916 and President Calvin Coolidge in 1924— but it wasn’t without criticism, with some detractors pointing out the mass commercialism of the growing celebration of the holiday. As Time notes, the holiday piqued the interest of many clothing manufacturers hoping to profit off a new-found holiday.

By 1966 and despite criticism, President Lyndon B. Johnson issued the first presidential proclamation calling upon the recognition of the third Sunday in June as Father’s Day, roughly 56 years after Dodd’s first celebration. “I invite State and local governments to cooperate in the observance of that day and I urge all our people to give public and private expression to the love and gratitude which they bear for their fathers,” he said during the proclamation.

Father’s Day may also have gained new momentum in the 60s and 70s and during the Vietnam War. As the feminist movement gained traction, women wanted equality in the workplace, and a more equitable domestic division of duties, as well. Now, men were sharing household chores more evenly. As Time notes, it “got stranger that women were celebrated in a way that fathers weren’t yet.”

Photo: Jeff T. Green (AP)

Eventually, under President Richard Nixon, Father’s Day was made official in 1972, with the former president calling upon all government buildings to raise the American flag in observance of the day. Dodd, who is officially recognized as the founder of Father’s Day, died six years later. Today, it’s estimated that Father’s Day is celebrated in 110 countries, with many celebrations also taking place in June.

So while you celebrate your dad this Sunday, don’t forget: the holiday has a long and thoughtful history and we have one woman to thank for giving fathers a special day of recognition. Now go give your dad a hug.


For more from Lifehacker, be sure to follow us on Instagram @lifehackerdotcom.

Curiosité

via Lifehacker https://lifehacker.com

June 11, 2019 at 01:01PM

iOS 13: Major new features explained!

iOS 13: Major new features explained!

iOS 13 brings several major changes to the iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Yes, iPad now runs iPadOS, but for right now that’s just a thin name on top of a very big stack. Here are some of the biggest changes in iOS 13 and iPadOS, how they work, and what they could mean for you and your workflows!

Rather watch than read? Hit play on the video version!

iOS 13: Dark mode

Dark Mode is going to be on every list from every lister. How can it not be? Anytime any platform announces it, it gets the loudest cheers this side of emoji. But, just like with macOS last year with its subtle, sampled tints and accents, Apple is Dark Moding smart.

First, they’ve established Symantec, dynamic colors. So, rather than hard code colors — for example, making a background RGB 0 0 0 black and label text RGB 255 255 255, that would break the instant you switch modes from light to dark — you simply refer to them as, in the example case, systemGroupedBackground and label respectively. And a blue icon isn’t RGB 10 132 255 anymore but systemBlue. That way, when you switch from light to dark or back, it’s not stuck on the same color but picks the appropriate color each time.

If you’re familiar with web design, think of it as something closer to CSS. And, what’s really cool, is that this sets up apps to work not just across a potentially wider range of themes but across a wider range of platforms. For example, Catalyst apps on the Mac will get the same light and dark mode support right out of the box. Or, rather, the checkbox.

There’s also a well thought out hierarchy, from absolute white or black backgrounds to increasingly darker shades for light them and lighter shades for dark theme, so the visual hierarchy is always clear. In other words, you can tell how many cards are stacked on top of each other by the shade of each card.

Same with text. Primary text is pure white on black, the inverse of backgrounds, and as you move towards secondary and tertiary text, the color moves across the spectrum of gray.

Same with controls as well. Dark mode doesn’t just invert light mode. A white button doesn’t become a black one. A white button with light gray states becomes a medium gray button with dark gray states. It can even apply to images, so, for example, a header with a daytime skyline in light mode can switch to a nighttime skyline in dark mode.

It’s all set up so that everything just looks right, in context, maintains legibility, and gives you a visual cue to how important it is, no matter which state you’re in.

Dark mode even gets its own materials look. In other words, the blur effect that helps separate content from controls, and the vibrancy that makes them seem real and alive.

I still really, really wish shadows would come back to iOS but, absent that, Apple’s done a good job defining spaces and relationships in a dark mode world.

And, for people like me, who find dark mode oppressive and straining during the day but blessedly subdued and calming at night, the automatic transition switch is absolutely aces.

iOS 13: Sign in with Apple

One of my favorite announcements this year was Sign in with Apple. It’s not specific to iOS — it’ll work on iPad OS, watchOS, macOS and even on Android or Chrome via JavaScript. But, it’s especially important on iOS not just because of the sheer number of iPhone users but because it fits the iPhone model, which demands speed and convenience, so damn perfectly.

Here’s how it works. Download an app, like a new game, and if it offers sign in with Google and Facebook, it has to offer sign in with Apple as well. Yeah, that’s totally Apple being a bully, but in totally the best-for-users way.

If the game doesn’t care about your data and just wants you in and playing as fast as possible, it can literally do just that. Tap and go. If it does want your data, like your name and email, Sign in with Apple will give it your verified Apple ID name and, if you’re ok with it, your verified Apple ID email address as well.

If you’re not ok with it, Sign in with Apple will create a burner address for you, random, anonymized, that you can reply to if and when needed, but also revoke any time, just for that app. And Apple never sees or retains any of these emails. Which also means companies like Facebook, which try to build shadow profiles on us based on connecting everything around our email addresses, are shut out of luck.

Sign in with Apple will even check Keychain to make sure you don’t already have an account, for example if you downloaded Fortnite and didn’t realize it was from Epic, but already had an Epic account. And if you do have an existing account, it’ll just prompt you to login rather than creating duplicate accounts, and that way you don’t lose any in-game currency or benefits or whatever attached to your existing account. It’s super clever.

It’ll also, on device, check a number of signals including how long you’ve been using the App Store, for example, and then flip a trust bit between true and false and send that on to the developer. If it’s true, it means Apple trusts you’re a real person and the developer can give you the red carpet treatment and doesn’t have to make you jump through hoops to validate yourself before you start using the app. If it’s not true, they can then go ahead with validation, just in case you’re a bot or a farmed account or whatever.

For us it means fewer passwords to remember and, because it uses Apple’s two-factor and Face ID or Touch ID authentication, better security as well as privacy, and almost transparent convenience.

And the developers I spoke to at the event seemed to love it to because it gives them all the advantages of a single sign-on system without them having to make a deal with the data exploitation devils and serve up their users to get it.

iOS 13: Siri & Machine Learning

John Gianandrea leaving his job as head of search and AI at Google in order to work on ethical machine learning at Apple, and subsequently becoming a Senior Vice President with his own AI org is probably going to go down in history as the biggest thing since Johny Srouji began heading up silicon, and we’ve all seen how that’s been working out.

It’s going to start slowly but it’s also going to snowball. This year, there’s a whole bunch of Siri and Siri-adjacent stuff coming in iOS 13, including full-on Voice Control, which I talked about in my iPadOS video — link in the description — and new, conversational, automation-integrated Siri shortcuts, which I’ll talk about in a video later this week.

Siri’s even getting a new voice. And yeah, it’s hella ironic that to sound more human Siri has to become more synthetic, but that’s AI.

When Siri gets a request for local data, like contacts, rather than having to anonymize and tokenize that data to preserve privacy while operating on it in the cloud, it just bounces the request back to your local device so neither you nor Apple ever has to worry about where or how your personal information is being stored or used. Which is phenomenal.

Siri is also getting a couple of new SiriKit intents. Maps, for one, so you can use Siri with Waze or Google Maps. Audio for another, so, as long as the developers implement it, you’ll be able to use Siri with everything from Overcast to Audible, Pandora to Spotify.

It’s a bummer it doesn’t work with video yet, because I’d love the same to work with Netflix or Nebula, but if you add this to the watchOS announcements around SwiftUI native apps and streaming audio, and Spotify has almost nothing left on its victimy little list to complain about. Revenue sharing aside — which, yeah, is a huge aside — in terms of implementation it’s all on them now.

What Apple’s doing here is pretty clever as well. The biggest hurdle to SiriKit for media has always been… the media. Siri has to be able to tell what content is available so it can cleanly separate the request from what’s being requested, especially in multiple languages. Some other assistants lock you into specific grammar patterns, which can be awkward. For Apple Music, Apple just brute-forces the catalog, which is beyond laborious.

Thanks to that, whatever overlaps with Apple’s catalog will just work. In other words, where the content is the same, everyone gets that for free. But no catalog overlaps entirely. So, for content that isn’t in Apple’s catalog, SiriKit is going to pull and front-load the most frequently and recently played content. That cuts down the overhead significantly in most cases.

There’s a bunch of other super-cool, Siri-adjacent stuff coming as well, including Message Announce for AirPods, multi-user for HomePod, and I think some stuff that hasn’t even made it into any of the announcements yet. I’ll get a video up on all of that as soon as possible as well.

iOS 13: Apple Maps

Apple launched their own Maps back with iOS 6 and, because they had no first-party data and no real idea how Maps was supposed to work, the result was a poorly integrated, poorly sanitized, poorly cleansed mish-mash of difference services resulting in… bad results. And also missing features like transit and street view.

Over the years, though, Apple worked to improve and expand them, adding back transit, and for the last little while, driving, flying, and hiking their way across the U.S. and other countries to make what they claim will eventually be the best Maps in the world.

The U.S. should be done by the end of this year, Canada and some other countries by the end of next, and then onward to everywhere they can safely, legally map.

They’re crowd-sourcing more than ever, but maintaining privacy by refusing to track your beginning and end points and throwing away random segments in between. And with iOS 13, they’re re-introducing a view of the street called Look Around. It’s the visual information you want with the video-game-like performance you never knew you wanted. And it’s got data layers so that you can get more information on whatever you see if and when you want to.

There are no AR maps yet, which still seems really strange to me given Apple’s investment in both those things separately.

There are favorites and collections, so you can easily get to frequent destinations or places you’ve book marked for a trip. And MapKit and MapKit JS, along with a cool new Snapshot feature, so all of this is also available in apps and on the web.

And, thanks to Voice Control, you can even use them like something straight out of Blade Runner now. Grid. Zoom. Enhance! (We just need to keep filing all the radars for Enhance.)

There’s also a great new privacy feature where, instead of always or only when using, you can now grant apps permission to use your location only once. That’s it. That’s all. And if they keep using it, by API hook or Bluetooth crook, Apple shows you what they’re tracking so can decide if it’s necessary and useful or just grossly creepy and shut them down or delete them off, whatever you like.

Love it so much.

iOS 13: Camera & Photos

Apple is almost certainly saving all the big camera updates for the iPhone 11 event and announcement but we did get a few new features and capabilities I wanted to touch on here and now.

First, there’s a new high key mono Portrait Lighting effect that gives you a black and white image on a white background instead of black. It’s only coming to 2018 iPhones, because it hits the A12 Neural Engine hard. It’s also not in the beta just yet, but when it gets added you’ll also be able to adjust the intensity, like you can Bokeh with depth control, and Apple has modeled each Portrait Lighting effect specifically for pulling the light back or pushing it up in close.

If you take a series of Live Photos, holding down on the first one now plays all of them seamlessly, one after the other, like a single long video.

Saliency was also the new geeky WWDC word of the week. And no, it has nothing to do with salt. It’s a fancy way to say relevancy and from audio to voice to image to everything, Apple’s machine learning is working to figure out what the most important elements are in any context and heat map them for you.

So, for example, making sure thumbnails contain faces or figures so you can more easily tell what’s important to you at a glance.

Then, there’s something we’ve been waiting a decade for. No, not smart orientation lock that still lets landscape photos and video go landscape. We’re still waiting on that. But video editing.

Video came to iPhone with iPhone 3G and iOS 3 in 2009 and, ten years later, so has editing. Now, not only can you easily rotate a video without round-tripping to iMovie, you can apply almost every kind of editing tool available to photos. It’s great for when you just want to fix the thing you have and not, you know, create something entirely new.

iOS 13 is currently in developer beta. It’ll come too public beta in early July and ship sometime this September.

Apple

via iMore – The #1 iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch blog https://www.imore.com/

June 11, 2019 at 01:45PM

iOS 13: Major new features explained!

iOS 13: Major new features explained!

http://bit.ly/2R7Zdxl

iOS 13 brings several major changes to the iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Yes, iPad now runs iPadOS, but for right now that’s just a thin name on top of a very big stack. Here are some of the biggest changes in iOS 13 and iPadOS, how they work, and what they could mean for you and your workflows!

Rather watch than read? Hit play on the video version!

iOS 13: Dark mode

Dark Mode is going to be on every list from every lister. How can it not be? Anytime any platform announces it, it gets the loudest cheers this side of emoji. But, just like with macOS last year with its subtle, sampled tints and accents, Apple is Dark Moding smart.

First, they’ve established Symantec, dynamic colors. So, rather than hard code colors — for example, making a background RGB 0 0 0 black and label text RGB 255 255 255, that would break the instant you switch modes from light to dark — you simply refer to them as, in the example case, systemGroupedBackground and label respectively. And a blue icon isn’t RGB 10 132 255 anymore but systemBlue. That way, when you switch from light to dark or back, it’s not stuck on the same color but picks the appropriate color each time.

If you’re familiar with web design, think of it as something closer to CSS. And, what’s really cool, is that this sets up apps to work not just across a potentially wider range of themes but across a wider range of platforms. For example, Catalyst apps on the Mac will get the same light and dark mode support right out of the box. Or, rather, the checkbox.

There’s also a well thought out hierarchy, from absolute white or black backgrounds to increasingly darker shades for light them and lighter shades for dark theme, so the visual hierarchy is always clear. In other words, you can tell how many cards are stacked on top of each other by the shade of each card.

Same with text. Primary text is pure white on black, the inverse of backgrounds, and as you move towards secondary and tertiary text, the color moves across the spectrum of gray.

Same with controls as well. Dark mode doesn’t just invert light mode. A white button doesn’t become a black one. A white button with light gray states becomes a medium gray button with dark gray states. It can even apply to images, so, for example, a header with a daytime skyline in light mode can switch to a nighttime skyline in dark mode.

It’s all set up so that everything just looks right, in context, maintains legibility, and gives you a visual cue to how important it is, no matter which state you’re in.

Dark mode even gets its own materials look. In other words, the blur effect that helps separate content from controls, and the vibrancy that makes them seem real and alive.

I still really, really wish shadows would come back to iOS but, absent that, Apple’s done a good job defining spaces and relationships in a dark mode world.

And, for people like me, who find dark mode oppressive and straining during the day but blessedly subdued and calming at night, the automatic transition switch is absolutely aces.

iOS 13: Sign in with Apple

One of my favorite announcements this year was Sign in with Apple. It’s not specific to iOS — it’ll work on iPad OS, watchOS, macOS and even on Android or Chrome via JavaScript. But, it’s especially important on iOS not just because of the sheer number of iPhone users but because it fits the iPhone model, which demands speed and convenience, so damn perfectly.

Here’s how it works. Download an app, like a new game, and if it offers sign in with Google and Facebook, it has to offer sign in with Apple as well. Yeah, that’s totally Apple being a bully, but in totally the best-for-users way.

If the game doesn’t care about your data and just wants you in and playing as fast as possible, it can literally do just that. Tap and go. If it does want your data, like your name and email, Sign in with Apple will give it your verified Apple ID name and, if you’re ok with it, your verified Apple ID email address as well.

If you’re not ok with it, Sign in with Apple will create a burner address for you, random, anonymized, that you can reply to if and when needed, but also revoke any time, just for that app. And Apple never sees or retains any of these emails. Which also means companies like Facebook, which try to build shadow profiles on us based on connecting everything around our email addresses, are shut out of luck.

Sign in with Apple will even check Keychain to make sure you don’t already have an account, for example if you downloaded Fortnite and didn’t realize it was from Epic, but already had an Epic account. And if you do have an existing account, it’ll just prompt you to login rather than creating duplicate accounts, and that way you don’t lose any in-game currency or benefits or whatever attached to your existing account. It’s super clever.

It’ll also, on device, check a number of signals including how long you’ve been using the App Store, for example, and then flip a trust bit between true and false and send that on to the developer. If it’s true, it means Apple trusts you’re a real person and the developer can give you the red carpet treatment and doesn’t have to make you jump through hoops to validate yourself before you start using the app. If it’s not true, they can then go ahead with validation, just in case you’re a bot or a farmed account or whatever.

For us it means fewer passwords to remember and, because it uses Apple’s two-factor and Face ID or Touch ID authentication, better security as well as privacy, and almost transparent convenience.

And the developers I spoke to at the event seemed to love it to because it gives them all the advantages of a single sign-on system without them having to make a deal with the data exploitation devils and serve up their users to get it.

iOS 13: Siri & Machine Learning

John Gianandrea leaving his job as head of search and AI at Google in order to work on ethical machine learning at Apple, and subsequently becoming a Senior Vice President with his own AI org is probably going to go down in history as the biggest thing since Johny Srouji began heading up silicon, and we’ve all seen how that’s been working out.

It’s going to start slowly but it’s also going to snowball. This year, there’s a whole bunch of Siri and Siri-adjacent stuff coming in iOS 13, including full-on Voice Control, which I talked about in my iPadOS video — link in the description — and new, conversational, automation-integrated Siri shortcuts, which I’ll talk about in a video later this week.

Siri’s even getting a new voice. And yeah, it’s hella ironic that to sound more human Siri has to become more synthetic, but that’s AI.

When Siri gets a request for local data, like contacts, rather than having to anonymize and tokenize that data to preserve privacy while operating on it in the cloud, it just bounces the request back to your local device so neither you nor Apple ever has to worry about where or how your personal information is being stored or used. Which is phenomenal.

Siri is also getting a couple of new SiriKit intents. Maps, for one, so you can use Siri with Waze or Google Maps. Audio for another, so, as long as the developers implement it, you’ll be able to use Siri with everything from Overcast to Audible, Pandora to Spotify.

It’s a bummer it doesn’t work with video yet, because I’d love the same to work with Netflix or Nebula, but if you add this to the watchOS announcements around SwiftUI native apps and streaming audio, and Spotify has almost nothing left on its victimy little list to complain about. Revenue sharing aside — which, yeah, is a huge aside — in terms of implementation it’s all on them now.

What Apple’s doing here is pretty clever as well. The biggest hurdle to SiriKit for media has always been… the media. Siri has to be able to tell what content is available so it can cleanly separate the request from what’s being requested, especially in multiple languages. Some other assistants lock you into specific grammar patterns, which can be awkward. For Apple Music, Apple just brute-forces the catalog, which is beyond laborious.

Thanks to that, whatever overlaps with Apple’s catalog will just work. In other words, where the content is the same, everyone gets that for free. But no catalog overlaps entirely. So, for content that isn’t in Apple’s catalog, SiriKit is going to pull and front-load the most frequently and recently played content. That cuts down the overhead significantly in most cases.

There’s a bunch of other super-cool, Siri-adjacent stuff coming as well, including Message Announce for AirPods, multi-user for HomePod, and I think some stuff that hasn’t even made it into any of the announcements yet. I’ll get a video up on all of that as soon as possible as well.

iOS 13: Apple Maps

Apple launched their own Maps back with iOS 6 and, because they had no first-party data and no real idea how Maps was supposed to work, the result was a poorly integrated, poorly sanitized, poorly cleansed mish-mash of difference services resulting in… bad results. And also missing features like transit and street view.

Over the years, though, Apple worked to improve and expand them, adding back transit, and for the last little while, driving, flying, and hiking their way across the U.S. and other countries to make what they claim will eventually be the best Maps in the world.

The U.S. should be done by the end of this year, Canada and some other countries by the end of next, and then onward to everywhere they can safely, legally map.

They’re crowd-sourcing more than ever, but maintaining privacy by refusing to track your beginning and end points and throwing away random segments in between. And with iOS 13, they’re re-introducing a view of the street called Look Around. It’s the visual information you want with the video-game-like performance you never knew you wanted. And it’s got data layers so that you can get more information on whatever you see if and when you want to.

There are no AR maps yet, which still seems really strange to me given Apple’s investment in both those things separately.

There are favorites and collections, so you can easily get to frequent destinations or places you’ve book marked for a trip. And MapKit and MapKit JS, along with a cool new Snapshot feature, so all of this is also available in apps and on the web.

And, thanks to Voice Control, you can even use them like something straight out of Blade Runner now. Grid. Zoom. Enhance! (We just need to keep filing all the radars for Enhance.)

There’s also a great new privacy feature where, instead of always or only when using, you can now grant apps permission to use your location only once. That’s it. That’s all. And if they keep using it, by API hook or Bluetooth crook, Apple shows you what they’re tracking so can decide if it’s necessary and useful or just grossly creepy and shut them down or delete them off, whatever you like.

Love it so much.

iOS 13: Camera & Photos

Apple is almost certainly saving all the big camera updates for the iPhone 11 event and announcement but we did get a few new features and capabilities I wanted to touch on here and now.

First, there’s a new high key mono Portrait Lighting effect that gives you a black and white image on a white background instead of black. It’s only coming to 2018 iPhones, because it hits the A12 Neural Engine hard. It’s also not in the beta just yet, but when it gets added you’ll also be able to adjust the intensity, like you can Bokeh with depth control, and Apple has modeled each Portrait Lighting effect specifically for pulling the light back or pushing it up in close.

If you take a series of Live Photos, holding down on the first one now plays all of them seamlessly, one after the other, like a single long video.

Saliency was also the new geeky WWDC word of the week. And no, it has nothing to do with salt. It’s a fancy way to say relevancy and from audio to voice to image to everything, Apple’s machine learning is working to figure out what the most important elements are in any context and heat map them for you.

So, for example, making sure thumbnails contain faces or figures so you can more easily tell what’s important to you at a glance.

Then, there’s something we’ve been waiting a decade for. No, not smart orientation lock that still lets landscape photos and video go landscape. We’re still waiting on that. But video editing.

Video came to iPhone with iPhone 3G and iOS 3 in 2009 and, ten years later, so has editing. Now, not only can you easily rotate a video without round-tripping to iMovie, you can apply almost every kind of editing tool available to photos. It’s great for when you just want to fix the thing you have and not, you know, create something entirely new.

iOS 13 is currently in developer beta. It’ll come too public beta in early July and ship sometime this September.

Apple

via iMore – The #1 iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch blog https://www.imore.com/

June 11, 2019 at 01:45PM

Five most important features coming to watchOS 6

Five most important features coming to watchOS 6

These are the five most important features coming to Apple Watch when watchOS 6 comes out this fall!

As with most operating system updates, watchOS 6 will bring quite a few changes to the Apple Watch when it launches this fall, both big and small changes have been apparent from the release of the developer beta. While the improvements and new features coming to Apple Watch in watchOS 6 are numerous, here are five key features we are most excited about!

Apple occasionally offers updates to iOS, watchOS, tvOS, and macOS as closed developer previews or public betas for iPhone, iPad, Apple TV and Mac (sadly, no public beta for the Apple Watch). While the betas contain new features, they also contain pre-release bugs that can prevent the normal use of your iPhone, iPad, Apple Watch, Apple TV, or Mac, and are not intended for everyday use on a primary device. That’s why we strongly recommend staying away from developer previews unless you need them for software development, and using the public betas with caution. If you depend on your devices, wait for the final release.

Cycle Tracking

With Apple always trying to find more ways to track health data with the Apple Watch, they’ve added Cycle Tracking to help women track their menstrual cycles. The Cycle app will let you mark which day your period hits and let you make notes about each day. You can let the app know whether its a heavy or light flow and mention any symptoms such as migraines, so you can keep a record and track your next period. Once the Cycle app is more accustomed to your cycle it will even send you notifications for when your period may start.

Data like this can help women understand their bodies even more, and cycle tracking on watchOS 6 will be a welcome addition for a lot of people.

Activity Trends

Of course, it wouldn’t be a watchOS update without some improvements to Activity, and the new Trends tab in the Activity app will let you get a better idea of how your performance on closing your rings is doing over time. The tab shows whether the trends are up or down for the three rings by comparing the last 365 days of data to your past 90 days of records. If the last 90 days of activity shows a downward trend relative to the last 365 days, the Activity app offers tips and coaching for ways to get your rings closed.

App Store

Finally, the App Store is coming to the Apple Watch. Not only does this mean you can search, download, and install apps all from your wrist, but also the App Store on Apple Watch will specifically help you find great apps that support Apple Watch.

Independent apps

Apple is also opening up to developers with watchOS 6 and allowing them access to the ability to create apps that can run on Apple Watch independently, meaning you don’t have to have your iPhone connected to use the apps. This makes watchOS 6 a more versatile platform than before, and I’m excited to see what new and existing apps will take advantage of this independence.

Noise

Last but not least, the Noise app is here to protect your ears from harm. The Noise App turns your Apple Watch into a decibel reader and will warn you if you’re in a loud environment that can cause hearing damage over time.

As the sound levels change, the app’s decibel meter moves in real time, so you can actively monitor how loud your surroundings are. Plus, your Apple Watch will send a notification if the decibel level reaches 90 decibels, according to the World Health Organization, about four hours per week in surroundings 90 decibels or louder can start to cause damage.

Which features of watchOS 6 are you most excited for?

Let us know what has you hyped up for watchOS 6 down below in the comments!

Apple

via iMore – The #1 iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch blog https://www.imore.com/

June 11, 2019 at 01:02PM

Five most important features coming to watchOS 6

Five most important features coming to watchOS 6

http://bit.ly/2ItdBfm

These are the five most important features coming to Apple Watch when watchOS 6 comes out this fall!

As with most operating system updates, watchOS 6 will bring quite a few changes to the Apple Watch when it launches this fall, both big and small changes have been apparent from the release of the developer beta. While the improvements and new features coming to Apple Watch in watchOS 6 are numerous, here are five key features we are most excited about!

Apple occasionally offers updates to iOS, watchOS, tvOS, and macOS as closed developer previews or public betas for iPhone, iPad, Apple TV and Mac (sadly, no public beta for the Apple Watch). While the betas contain new features, they also contain pre-release bugs that can prevent the normal use of your iPhone, iPad, Apple Watch, Apple TV, or Mac, and are not intended for everyday use on a primary device. That’s why we strongly recommend staying away from developer previews unless you need them for software development, and using the public betas with caution. If you depend on your devices, wait for the final release.

Cycle Tracking

With Apple always trying to find more ways to track health data with the Apple Watch, they’ve added Cycle Tracking to help women track their menstrual cycles. The Cycle app will let you mark which day your period hits and let you make notes about each day. You can let the app know whether its a heavy or light flow and mention any symptoms such as migraines, so you can keep a record and track your next period. Once the Cycle app is more accustomed to your cycle it will even send you notifications for when your period may start.

Data like this can help women understand their bodies even more, and cycle tracking on watchOS 6 will be a welcome addition for a lot of people.

Activity Trends

Of course, it wouldn’t be a watchOS update without some improvements to Activity, and the new Trends tab in the Activity app will let you get a better idea of how your performance on closing your rings is doing over time. The tab shows whether the trends are up or down for the three rings by comparing the last 365 days of data to your past 90 days of records. If the last 90 days of activity shows a downward trend relative to the last 365 days, the Activity app offers tips and coaching for ways to get your rings closed.

App Store

Finally, the App Store is coming to the Apple Watch. Not only does this mean you can search, download, and install apps all from your wrist, but also the App Store on Apple Watch will specifically help you find great apps that support Apple Watch.

Independent apps

Apple is also opening up to developers with watchOS 6 and allowing them access to the ability to create apps that can run on Apple Watch independently, meaning you don’t have to have your iPhone connected to use the apps. This makes watchOS 6 a more versatile platform than before, and I’m excited to see what new and existing apps will take advantage of this independence.

Noise

Last but not least, the Noise app is here to protect your ears from harm. The Noise App turns your Apple Watch into a decibel reader and will warn you if you’re in a loud environment that can cause hearing damage over time.

As the sound levels change, the app’s decibel meter moves in real time, so you can actively monitor how loud your surroundings are. Plus, your Apple Watch will send a notification if the decibel level reaches 90 decibels, according to the World Health Organization, about four hours per week in surroundings 90 decibels or louder can start to cause damage.

Which features of watchOS 6 are you most excited for?

Let us know what has you hyped up for watchOS 6 down below in the comments!

Apple

via iMore – The #1 iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch blog https://www.imore.com/

June 11, 2019 at 01:02PM

The 25 iOS 13 Changes and Settings You Must Know

The 25 iOS 13 Changes and Settings You Must Know

iOS 13 Changes Settings Featured

A new OS update is more than just the big banner features. A good yearly update should come with changes to the existing features as well. Changes that make things better, or fixes flaws from the previous version of the OS. And iOS 13 does that, quite a lot. In some ways, it takes the last couple of years of small complaints and fixes them at once. Take a look at all the iOS 13 changes and settings you should know about.

iOS 13 Changes and Settings You Should Know About

To learn about the new features in iOS 13 and iPadOS 13, check out our lists for What’s New in iOS 13 and What’s New in iPadOS 13.

1. Peek Works Across All iOS Devices

iPadOS 13 Peek

You can now tap and hold on any link or photo to open a little preview, with action items at the bottom. This was something that was only reserved for phones with 3D Touch. Now it works on all iPhones and best of all, all iPads. Even on the iPhone X, there’s no need to 3D Touch for this feature.

2. Volume and Silent Mode HUD Moved

iOS 13 Volume HUD Screenshot

The new Volume HUD appears in the top-left corner of the screen in an unintrusive manner. It first shows up as a full sized slide. But it immediately shrinks and becomes unintrusive.

iOS 13 New Ringer Switch Animation

The intrusive HUD for ringer switch is gone as well. Now you’ll see a pill-shaped drop-down when you enable and disable Silent mode.

3. Redesigned Now Playing Screen

iOS 13 Up Next and Repeat in Apple Music

The Now Playing screen in Apple Music has been redesigned. Features are no longer hidden behind the scrolling menu. While that’s the great news, it also means that Shuffle and Repeat buttons have been moved again.

And even this time they are hidden and quite small. You’ll have to tap on the Up Next button and then find the Shuffle and Repeat icons next to the Up Next title.

4. Better Card Sheet Interface

One of the issues of redesigning iOS 13 must have been the card sheet interface. This is when a scrollable sheet pops up from the bottom of the screen. Apple has fixed it by removing the card sheet interface from places like the Now Playing screen in the Music app. And they’ve made it more pronounced.

The card sheet actually has a header now, with the name of the section at the top. There is empty space and stacking UI at the top to make it easier to discern which card sheet you’re viewing.

5. Redesigned Tabs Everywhere

iOS 13 New Tabs UI

It’s a similar story with tabs. The previous, plan tabs would be hard to discern in the dark interface. So Apple has added color inside the tab and depth around it. You can easily tell which tab is activated and which isn’t.

6. Persistent Connectivity for Hotspot

This change will be appreciated by Mac users who rely on their iPhone for an internet connection. Apple has reworked the Personal Hotspot process so that it doesn’t immediately disable itself when your Mac is inactive. It stays on in the background for a while. This little change will reduce the frustration of using an iPhone as a hotspot.

7. Accessibility in Main Settings Screen

Accessibility is now a main section in Settings. And each sub-section in Accessibility gets an icon. The whole section has been reshuffled and features are now paired in sensible buckets.

8. New Undo and Redo Gestures

Along with the new gestures for copy and paste, there are new features for undo and redo that work on both iPhone and iPad. To undo text entry or an action, you can just swipe right with three fingers on the screen. The opposite gesture will redo the change.

9. Separate Icons for Globe and Emoji Buttons

iOS 13 Keyboard Globe Emoji buttons

This little change makes things much simpler. In iPhone X and higher, the Globe key is now detached from the keyboard and is now replaced with a persistent emoji button. This gives you quick access to all your emojis and you no longer need to tap and hold the Globe button to switch keyboards every time.

10. Redesigned Markup Toolset

iOS 13 New Markup UI

The redesigned markup tool is great to use on the iPad. It can now be moved anywhere on the screen. Plus, there are new tools for quickly selecting a part of the image or the screen using your Apple Pencil.

11. Voice Control

Voice Control is a new accessibility feature that allows the user to control the whole device using just the voice. In this mode, the user can ask the iPhone to open apps, take actions like pressing a button or enter text and more. The audio is constantly working in the background and is processed on the device.

12. Redesigned Share Sheet with List of Actions

iOS 13 New Share Sheet Design

Share sheet in iOS 13 has one tap suggestions for sharing a photo or document with some who is in the photo. There’s a new actions bar that comes up based on the content.

13. Wi-Fi and Bluetooth Switching from Control Center

Control Center Wi-Fi Toggles

Finally, Apple is letting users switch between different Wi-Fi networks right from the Control Center.

14. Siri Sounds a Lot Human

The new Siri voice is created completely from text-to-speech and isn’t based on snippets of recording. This means it’s a lot more pleasing to the ears.

15. Updated Start Page and UI for Safari

iPadOS 13 Safari Start Page

New Start page in safari includes favorites, frequently visited and recently visited websites.

16. New Photos Tab in the Photos App

iOS 13 Photos App New View

Apple has updated the Photos app to help you bring out the best photos. If you switch to the Days tab, you’ll now see only the top picks from the given day. It will hide the screenshots and other kinds of photos. The same goes for the month view. The Year view is quite interesting because it shows the photo from the same day in the preview box for the given year. This way you can just scroll and see a photo from the day dating back to when you started using your iPhone.

17. Redesigned Photo and Video Editor

iOS 13 Photo Editor

Apple has finally redesigned the Photos app editor as well. It’s a much simpler view. You tap on the control at the top and then use the slider below to edit it. It’s similar to the Instagram app. While the photo editor has all the current controls, it also adds new ones for highlights, vibrance, and more.

Using the new video editor in Photos app you can easily crop, rotate or add filters to a video.

18. Extended Reply Menu in Mail

iOS 13 Mail App

When you press the reply button you’ll see a new sheet. It will have buttons for Reply, Forward, Delete, Flag, Unread, Move and Archive.

19. Updated Timer Interface

iOS 13 New Timer UI

There’s a new UI when you start a new timer. You’ll see a circle around the countdown timer which visually shows you how much time is left. And it also shows the time at which the timer will go off.

20. Improved Maps UI

iOS 13 Maps Look Around Street View

Maps app in iOS 13 is much better, thanks to Apple’s new mapping project. Maps app now shows detailed maps for many big towns across US. And it also has a new Google Street View type of feature called Look Around.

21. New Smart Entry Interface Reminders

iOS 13 Reminders App Hands on 1

Reminders has a full redesign but what stands out most is the Hub style home screen of the app, and the new smart reminders entry using Natural Langauge Processing. You’ll be able to type a full entry like “doctor’s appointment at 6 PM on 30th” and Reminders app will give you a suggestion to add the date and time to the reminder with just a tap.

22. App Updates Page Moved

iOS 13 Updates in Accounts Tab

Thanks to the new Arcade tab, the Updates tab in the App Store has been moved. It’s now a section in the Account screen. You’ll need to tap on your Profile icon, to view all available app updates.

23. Bypass Cellular Download Limit for App Store

iOS 13 App Downloads Limit

Apple has removed the 200MB Cellular Data limit for app downloads. When an app is over 200MB it will ask if you want to download it anyway. But there’s a setting where you can permanently disable this limit.

24. New Summary View in Health App

iOS 13 Health App New

The redesigned health app has a new Summary section that shows new insightful data.

25. Save Folders to Local Storage

iPadOS 13 Local Folders

One of the biggest annoyances of the Files app has been fixed. You can now create folders for the local storage on the iPad. There’s no need to use iCloud Drive every time. Apps will be able to use these folders as well.

Take A Look At Our iOS 13 Hands-On Series

If you’re interested to know how some of the new features in iOS 13 work, take a look at our ongoing Hands-on series.

Your Favorite iOS 13 Features?

What are some of your favorite new features in iOS 13 and iPadOS 13? What is the one small change in the new OS that you really like or you were waiting for? Share with us in the comments below.

iPhone

via iPhone Hacks | iPad, iPod… http://bit.ly/tHINsU

June 11, 2019 at 11:30AM

Quarante-neuf morts dans l’attaque de mosquées en Nouvelle-Zélande

https://ift.tt/2Jg1Ywc morts dans l’attaque de mosquées en Nouvelle-Zélande

https://ift.tt/2TSVU0w

Quarante-neuf personnes ont été tuées pendant la prière du vendredi dans des attaques contre deux…

Info-Fr

via Manchettes – Le Devoir https://ift.tt/2R8oYfw

March 15, 2019 at 12:52AM

Manage your DJI drone’s firmware like a boss with your Mac

Manage your DJI drone’s firmware like a boss with your Mac

http://bit.ly/2B3JvMC

If you’re having firmware issues on your DJI drone or you’d just rather not have to do it wirelessly with your phone or tablet, there’s a great way to handle it with your Mac. Here’s what you need to know.

Products used in this guide

First thing’s first

The first thing to do is download and install the DJI Assistant 2 application on your Mac. There are a few different versions of it, and while the features and how the apps work is basically the same, each version is specific to different drones.

There’s a version for most of the drones made in 2018 and earlier, including the Mavic Pro and Mavic Air, a dedicated version for the Mavic 2, the Phantom, and many other DJI products besides. All you need to do is make sure you check you’re selecting the right version for your drone from the downloads page.

It’s also a good idea to use whatever USB cable came with the drone to connect it to your Mac. We’ve experienced issues that were rectified simply by using this cable instead, so it’s a good idea to make sure you use it.

How to update your DJI drone firmware with your Mac

The images below were gathered using the Windows version of DJI Assistant 2, but the application and steps required is the same on the Mac.

  1. Connect the micro USB cable to the drone.
  2. Connect the same micro USB cable to your Mac.
  3. Turn on the drone (press then press and hold the power button in most cases.)
  4. Open the DJI Assistant 2 application on your Mac.

  5. Select your drone from the main screen.

  6. Select firmware update from the left-hand menu.

  7. Once the available firmware builds have populated, select the most recent one.
  8. Click the start update button.

The app will now download the latest firmware and flash it to your drone. The process will take a little while and the drone will reboot as part of it.

Besides being an easy way to update to the latest firmware, you can also use DJI Assistant 2 as a way to reset your drone to factory settings, refresh the current firmware installation, or downgrade to an older build if there are bugs you’re not happy with in the newer ones.

How to update your DJI controller with your Mac

Unless your drone and controller have consistent firmwares, you’ll get warning messages when you try to fly and you’ll be forced to update before taking off. So while you’re updating the drone, update its controller in a very similar way using your Mac.

  1. Connect the micro USB cable to the controller.
  2. Connect the same micro USB cable to your Mac.
  3. Turn on the controller (press then press and hold the power button in most cases).
  4. Open the DJI Assistant 2 application on your Mac.
  5. Select your controller from the main screen.

  6. Select firmware update from the left-hand menu.

  7. Once the available firmware builds have populated, select the most recent one.
  8. Click the start update button.

As with the drone, the DJI Assistant 2 app can also be used to downgrade the controller’s firmware, refresh or restore to factory settings.

There are plenty of other things you can do with the DJI Assistant 2 app, but for most people handling firmware is the biggest convenience. By using it you can minimize your risk of having to download anything before you fly, though as it can’t handle battery firmware updates, you’ll still need to download these through the DJI Go app on your phone or tablet.

Our top equipment picks

DJI Assistant 2 works with all recent DJI drones, but it’s a great time to pick up the Mavic Pro Platinum featured here.

Droning on

DJI Mavic Pro Platinum

$880 at Amazon

Quiet, great battery life and priced to move

The Mavic Pro Platinum is quieter than the original model while still boasting the same great 12MP camera capable of stunning 4K video.

Since the Mavic 2 line arrived in 2018, prices of the previous generation Mavic Pro Platinum have fallen a fair bit. It’s still a phenomenal drone, but now within reach of tighter budgets.

Additional Equipment

To manage your drone and controller’s firmware from your PC you also need the free DJI Assistant 2 application.

DJI Assistant 2

Free at DJI

Manage firmware, flight logs and more from your Mac with the DJI Assistant 2 app.

Apple

via iMore – The #1 iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch blog https://www.imore.com/

January 24, 2019 at 10:35AM

Live Photos: The ultimate guide

Live Photos: The ultimate guide

http://bit.ly/2sp9HwI

The idea of moving pictures isn’t new (any Harry Potter fan will tell you that!) but thanks to Live Photos, everyone can take and share them!

Live Photos aren’t quiiiite video, but rather a full-on 12-megapixel photo that animates 1.5 seconds of motion before and after the still. Super cool, right?!

You can take them with any iPhone from the iPhone 6s onward, as well as iPad Pro.

How to take a Live Photo with your iPhone or iPad

Live Photo can easily be turned on and left on, or turned off and only turned on when you expressly want to use it — which is a great option if you’re looking to save the battery and some space on your iPhone.

Since Live Photos (which combine a 12-megapixel JPG image with a ~15FPS MOV file) take about twice the amount of storage, and require you to keep the camera relatively still for three seconds, both your storage and patience might lean you towards the latter approach.

The important thing to remember is that a Live Photo is not a movie. It doesn’t start when you hit the shutter. Instead, it grabs the photo.

Think of it this way: the moment you hit the shutter is the mid-point of your live photo, the still that’s wrapped in animation before and after. Grasp that, and your Live Photos will turn out just the way you want them!

  1. Launch the Camera app from your Home screen.
  2. Tap the Live Photo button, top center (looks like a set of diffusing rings) to toggle it on (yellow).
  3. Tap the Shutter button to take your Live Photo.

The Live Photo icon will animate with a brief ripple and a yellow LIVE label will pop up to briefly alert you that it’s on. A white LIVE OFF label will briefly alert you when it’s not on.

How to view Live Photos on a newer iPhone model

Viewing a Live Photo on one of Apple’s current-generation iPhone models (iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus) is easy-peasy!

  1. Launch the Photos app from your Home screen.
  2. Find the Live Photo you want to view.
  3. Press firmly on the photo to animate it.

It’ll blur for just a second and then start to play.

How to view Live Photos on an older iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch

If someone who can take a Live Photo sends or shares one with you, as long as you have an iPhone or iPad — even an older one that can run iOS 9 or later — you can still watch it come to life.

  1. Find the Live Photo you want to view.
  2. Touch and hold the photo to animate it.

How to share Live Photos on your iPhone or iPad

You can share your Live Photos right from the standard iOS Share sheet. Here’s how!

If your social service of choice currently doesn’t support Live Photos, here’s how you can share them elsewhere.

  1. Launch the Photos app from your Home screen.
  2. Find and tap the Live Photo you’d like to share. If a photo is a Live one, you’ll see a gray "Live" indicator in the upper left of your screen.
  3. Tap the Share button on the bottom left of your screen. It’s a box with an upward-pointing arrow.
  4. Tap a sharing method. You can share to just about any social media platform, and you can even share your GIFS to YouTube.
  5. Follow the on-screen prompts to share it like you normally would with the method of your choice.

How to set a Live Photo as the wallpaper

You can set Live Photos as your wallpaper on iPhone 7 or later or as a clock face on Apple Watch, which works especially well for loved ones, children, pets, and landscapes.

  1. Launch the Photos app from your Home screen.
  2. Find the Live Photo you want to use as your wallpaper.
  3. Tap the Share button.
  4. Tap the Use as Wallpaper button.
  5. Tap Live Photo on the lower right of your screen if it’s not already selected.
  6. Tap Set. You can’t adjust the size of a Live Photo wallpaper.
  7. Tap Set Lock Screen, Set Home Screen, or optionally Set Both.

How to extract a still shot from a Live Photo

If you want the photo without the live, you can make a copy that gives you just that. You can also export Live Photos as GIFs, if you want the live without the photo!

  1. Open the Photos app.
  2. Select the Live Photo you want to extract a still shot from.
  3. Tap the Share icon in the bottom left corner of the screen.

  4. Tap Duplicate in the option tray at the bottom of the screen.
  5. Tap Duplicate as Still Photo.

A copy of the still photo will appear in your library right next to the original Live Photo. You can delete the Live Photo if you no longer want it to take up storage on your iPhone.

How to turn a Live Photo into a GIF

There’s no longer any need to connect your iPhone to your Mac and go through the rigmarole of picking a GIF creator app. You can do it all right in the Photos app!

  1. Launch the Photos app from your Home screen.
  2. Find and tap the Live Photo you’d like to turn into a GIF.
  3. Swipe up on the center of the screen to reveal the animation options.
  4. Tap Loop if you’d like to loop the Live Photo as a GIF. You can also choose to "Bounce" it á la the Boomerang app for Instagram.

You’ll then be able to find your GIF in the Animated album in the Photos app.

How to use Giphy to turn GIFs into Live Photos

Questions?

Let us know in the comments below!

Updated January 2019: Updated screenshots and steps for all the latest for Live Photos and added all of our Live Photos how-tos into this one ultimate guide!

Apple

via iMore – The #1 iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch blog https://www.imore.com/

January 11, 2019 at 12:05PM

33 of the Best Mac Tips from 2018

33 of the Best Mac Tips from 2018

http://bit.ly/2R4ykgW


Great Mac tips from 2018

Happy New Year! We’ve put together a collection of some of the best Mac tips and tricks we covered from the past year, 2018. These are certainly not the most popular tips from the year prior, but they are some of the more interesting or useful tips and tricks for Mac users to know, covering a broad range of topics. Some you may know, some you may not.

Anyway, browse around and take a look at the link list below, and perhaps you’ll learn something new!

And if you feel like sharing any of your own favorite tips or tricks you learned in the past year, feel free to share them below in the comments!

Related

Apple

via OS X Daily http://osxdaily.com

January 1, 2019 at 02:33PM